What Is a DNS Filter & How Is It Used?

What Is a DNS Filter & How Is It Used?

Guarding digital footprints while online is a collective responsibility. For instance, if you have a business website that customers log in to every day, you must guarantee the data security and privacy.

Because data privacy has become a sensitive issue with advancing technology, most companies and individuals are adopting the most effective ways to combat breaches. These include using DNS filters to protect devices and networks from hacking, malware, viruses, and cybercrime.

Many myths surround the usage of DNS filters for blocking malicious websites and protecting devices from external harm. For example, some people believe that there is no need to have a DNS filter for your network if you already have an antivirus. 

In this article, we debunk the myths and misconceptions about DNS filtering and discuss the benefits of using an open DNS content filter in your school network. 

What Is a DNS Filter?

The Domain Name System (DNS) is like a universal phonebook for the web. It is responsible for translating a URL to a language that computers understand. 

When you insert a URL on a browser, the DNS changes the words into numbers that a computer can understand, known as an IP address. Your browser then displays the information found at that address. It is not easy to remember the numbers of IP addresses, so DNS translates them to common words. 

A DNS filter blocks a website that it believes to be a threat to its users. The website could be hosting harmful content or be created by hackers to steal sensitive information from users. 

DNS filtering is a process of blocking access to all websites that have been deemed a threat. A DNS filter blocks a website’s IP address so that it is not available when users click on its link on search engines. Most websites that fall into a DNS filters’ jaws include gambling, adult content, torrenting sites, and other productivity sinks.

Every business needs a dedicated DNS filter to remain secure online and protect its information system from data loss and cybercrime. Networks can be exposed to threats like viruses and malware, but with a DNS filter, you can significantly reduce the risk of cyber threats. With a dedicated DNS filter, you can block up to 88 percent of malware on the internet from reaching your network. 

How DNS Filtering Works

When building your website, you have to purchase a domain name from a domain name registry to host your site on the internet. This domain name acts as your internet address. When users want to find your website online, they must enter the domain name, or URL, in their browser and wait for your website to load.

This is where DNS filtering comes in. The DNS looks up your IP address and connects a browser to a web server to obtain the information you are looking for. This process often takes just seconds. The web page is loaded on the screen once the browser connects to the web server.

Known for his amazing writing and technical blogging skills, Edward Thompson is the admin of the Techenger. Joined back in 2019, after moving from San Francisco to Chicago to switch from his role of staff writer to a guest blogger. Since then, he never looked back to his past. In nutshell, he is a tech enthusiast who loves to write, read, test, evaluate, and spread knowledge about the growing technology that surrounds mankind.

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